What Works for Me: Work/Life/Rest Balance

Today –

Mostly live from the MBFRLife headquarters –

News just in –

If you have a chronic condition that limits your daily activities

You don’t HAVE to just sit on the sofa all day, moaning about how crappy your life is like some people do.  You can actually have a life.  A happy and fulfilling one too.  If you’re ready and you want to.

While I’m writing this, I have a few people I know in mind.  I work as a Community Adult Social Support Worker, and I’ve seen a few things, let me tell you.  I also have personal experience with various family members in the whole age range who experience chronic conditions, chronic pain, mental health issues and disability –

Everyone’s got something, right?

No? That’s because you’re still young…or incredibly lucky.

Oh, and I have Rheumatoid Arthritis, one of the autoimmune’s systems hilarious inflammatory japes.  It limits my activities most days and makes me sleep like a Grizzly in January sometimes, but with a lot more snoring.

So – back on track.  Have you heard of the Spoon Theory of chronic illness? If you haven’t, go google it if you want to.  I’m not going to bore you with it, I personally find it an irritating idea condensing one’s life of pain and illness down to how many bloody spoons you have.  I’m not 5.

All I know is, if I’m physically active (which to me means up on my feet, doing something with my hands) for 10 minutes, I then need to sit for 10 minutes.  Then I’m fine again to continue with what I was doing.

Permit me, if you don’t mind, to cannibalise Newton’s Third Law of Motion 

For Every Action, There is an Equal and Opposite Reaction

I choose to view this as:

For Every Activity Undertaken, I Must Rest for an Equal Amount of Time

This can be distilled into a simple formula:

W = R + C

Where W = Time spent Working, R = Time spent Resting, C = Coffee

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Conversely, if you have been sitting a long while, say you accidentally binged watched old episodes of Desperate Housewives one Saturday afternoon while your husband was visiting his mother, this formula must also be true:

R + C = W

Because moving your butt is good for you.

If you wanted to, you could add (Ch) to the formula,

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In some instances, it is helpful to add pi:

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And so,

For Every Activity Undertaken, I Must Rest for an Equal Amount of Time

This is what works for me.

Some days ‘rest’ means a little sit down.  Other days it means a 2 hour nap.  Most days it means sitting with my feet up, coffee and TV remote at hand, and doggie between my knees.  But only for the amount of time it takes to rest up, not for hours on end.

I can do so much more if I pace myself, rather than throwing my tired, twisted body into things headlong. That way leads to pain and misery for everyone.  I like to share my feelings, so sue me.

If I’m out and about, I take opportunities to sit down whenever I can.  It means I can shop for hours or go for days out now.  Awesome.

Especially if those opportunities come with a

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Making a point of resting means I can do stuff the next day.  It means I can keep my home mostly organised and clean, homeschool my 16 year old, work, and be an absolutely wonderful wife and mother.

Hahahaha! No.

It’s not a miracle worker.

I hope you’ve enjoyed today’s post –

Jude x

P.s. apology:

Mr BFRLife, an electrical engineer, and the elder Miss BFRLife student of Physics and Maths, both think my formula is lame.  I can hear them out in the kitchen talking about Work Done formula, power and energy, velocity, vectors and something else.  The younger Miss BFRLife is doing something Pokémon related in her bedroom, and I’m certain couldn’t give tuppence about my formula. She sits down more often than I do.  

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Hi, I’m Jude.  I am a married mother of 2 teenagers, I work as a social care disability support worker a few hours a week when I’m not home-schooling my daughter who has a disability, or blogging. Or cleaning.  I write about Rheumatoid Arthritis, chronic illness and disability and any other related things that affect my little family.  I try my best to be funny too.

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A-Z of RA

Welcome to the first instalment of the A-Z of RA.

I’m not a fan of reading long posts, and thus am not a fan of writing them either, so I’ll keep it short and sweet.

This time the letter is – hold on to your saddle – A.

Shocking, I know.

If you’re still with me, I shall continue.

 

A is for

 

Age

The average age of onset varies according to source, but all agree that between 40 and 60 years old is the most common age range of onset, although it can and does happen earlier.  Babies, children and teens under 17 are diagnosed with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (aka Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis) by the thousands worldwide each year.

 

Autoimmune

Rheumatoid Arthritis is an autoimmune disease.  Simply put, the immune system has gone haywire and attacks the squishy parts of the joints, not the bones as in wear and tear Osteoarthritis.  RA can cause inflammation in any part of the body, which can be embarrassing if your eyes are bloodshot for months on end.  It can also be fatal if that which is inflamed is the heart sack or blood vessels.  Eeeeww.

 

On that happy note, I shall bid you adieu – thank you for reading!

– Jude

 

Hand X-Ray image from Wikipedia Commons

 

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Hi, I’m Jude.  I am a married mother of 2 teenagers, I work as a social care disability support worker a few hours a week when I’m not home-schooling my daughter who has a disability, or blogging. Or cleaning.  I write about Rheumatoid Arthritis, chronic illness and disability and any other related things that affect my little family.  I try my best to be funny too.

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Friday Cartoon Quickie

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This happens to me ALL THE TIME!

Is it because I’m old? NO!

Is it because I’m a woman? NO!

Is it because I’m a busy wife, mother, worker, who’s also chronically ill? NO!

Oh, ok, it’s all of those things!

Happy Friday Folks!

Jude x

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Hi, I’m Jude.  I am a married mother of 2 teenagers, I work as a social care disability support worker a few hours a week when I’m not home-schooling my daughter who has a disability, or blogging. Or cleaning.  I write about Rheumatoid Arthritis, chronic illness and disability and any other related things that affect my little family.  I try my best to be funny too.

Click Here to subscribe to this blog.

Click Here to find me on Facebook or Twitter.

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Quotes Wednesday

The subject today is ‘hope’…

We must free ourselves of the hope that the sea will ever rest. We must learn to sail in high winds.

Aristotle Onassis

“We must learn to sail in the high winds,” because, as the saying goes, “Sh*t Happens!”

Quote from BrainyQuote

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Hi, I’m Jude.  I am a married mother of 2 teenagers, I work as a social care disability support worker a few hours a week when I’m not home-schooling my daughter who has a disability, or blogging. Or cleaning.  I write about Rheumatoid Arthritis, chronic illness and disability and any other related things that affect my little family.  I try my best to be funny too.

Click Here to subscribe to this blog.

Click Here to find me on Facebook or Twitter.

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Friday Cartoon Quickie

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We’ve all been there!

Happy Friday!

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Hi, I’m Jude.  I am a married mother of 2 teenagers, I work as a social care disability support worker a few hours a week when I’m not home-schooling my daughter who has a disability, or blogging. Or cleaning.  I write about Rheumatoid Arthritis, chronic illness and disability and any other related things that affect my little family.  I try my best to be funny too.

Click Here to subscribe to this blog.

Click Here to find me on Facebook or Twitter.

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Blog Name Change Vote Results…

I bet you can hardly hold your breath in anticipation…

I asked you, dear reader, to vote on whether I should change the name of this blog – 

The result was a massive 71% in favour of keeping it as is!

Thank you to those of you who took the time to read and vote.

You will never know how grateful I am for your support.

Thank you.

Jude.

 

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Hi, I’m Jude.  I am a married mother of 2 teenagers, I work as a social care disability support worker a few hours a week when I’m not home-schooling my daughter who has a disability, or blogging. Or cleaning.  I write about Rheumatoid Arthritis, chronic illness and disability and any other related things that affect my little family.  I try my best to be funny too.

Click Here to subscribe to this blog.

Click Here to find me on Facebook or Twitter.

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Quotes Wednesday

A quote about happiness today –

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Enjoying the moment – being present and aware – is the ticket to happiness and peace.

I certainly find this hard to achieve!  I seem to spend my life thinking about the past, being mired in it even, and dreading the future.

I view the present as something that has to be endured – as something that will put further distance between me and the past.

Because Time Heals all Wounds.

And I really shouldn’t view the present that way.  I ought to embrace and enjoy it, like Charles Spurgeon said to.

But I can’t.

I’m grieving the past and afraid of the future.

Why is my heart so full of sorrow?

What is wrong with me?

 

 

 

Charles Spurgeon was an English Baptist Minister; in case you were wondering!

Quote from BrainyQuote

 

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Hi, I’m Jude.  I am a married mother of 2 teenagers, I work as a social care disability support worker a few hours a week when I’m not home-schooling my daughter who has a disability, or blogging. Or cleaning.  I write about Rheumatoid Arthritis, chronic illness and disability and any other related things that affect my little family.  I try my best to be funny too.

Click Here to subscribe to this blog.

Click Here to find me on Facebook or Twitter.

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